The Ultimate Question If Jesus Was Truly God

Continued from Part 34

Is the Trinity Doctrine a New Testament teaching?
Paul, speaking of Jesus says, “for in him all the fullness of deity dwells in bodily form” (Colossians 2:9).  Whether Paul is teaching a form of dualism or that this supposed supernatural power that has indwelled Jesus has become God’s unique representative to mankind is a dispute for Christian commentators to ponder.  

What You Need To Understand When Jesus Was Represented As Subordinate

Continued from Part 14

Subordination and subjection
Wherever the relationship of Jesus to God is treated in the New Testament, Jesus is always represented in a subordinate position.  This subordinate role can be seen in the fact that Jesus views himself as a messenger:  “He who receives you receives me, and he who receives me receives Him who sent me” (Matthew 10:40; see also John 5:36).  Jesus acknowledges his subordination and subjection to God when he declares that God is greater than he is (John 14:28), that he does nothing on his own initiative, speaking and doing only what God has taught him (John 8:28-29), and seeking not his own will, but the will of the God who sent him (John 5:30, 6:38).

Was Jesus Truly The Creator? Full Explanations You Need To Consider

Continued from Part 11

Nevertheless, Barnes believes that Jesus is himself the uncreated and eternal Creator.  However, he does not base his belief on Revelation 3:14.  Of this verse he says:

If it were demonstrated from other sources that Christ was, in fact, a created being, and the first that God had made, it cannot be denied that this language would appropriately express that fact.  But it cannot be made out from the mere use of the language here; and as the language is susceptible of other interpretations, it cannot be employed to prove that Christ is a created being.3

Does The New Testament Consider God And Jesus To Be The Same?

Continued from Part 8

Paul’s Jesus:  A savior but not God

The New Testament authors make a definite distinction between the one-and-only God and Jesus, never considering them one and the same.  For instance, we find this distinction expressed in the statement:  “Kindness and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord” (2 Peter 1:2).  This clarifies the meaning of the preceding verse, which reads, in part, “by the righteousness of our God and of [the] Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 1:1).  The author of these two verses indicates that he considers God and Jesus to be two distinct beings.  

Coequality Necessities Within The Trinity

John quotes Jesus as saying:  “I am going to the Father, because the Father is greater than I am” (John 14:28).  Is this coequality within the Trinity?  According to the New Testament, Jesus referred to God as “my God” both before and after his supposed resurrection (Matthew 27:46; John 20:17; Revelation 3:12).  Thus, according to the New Testament, Jesus did not consider himself to be God or God’s coequal, but instead recognized his subservience to God to whom he must go.  As John’s postresurrection Jesus says to Mary Magdalene, “I ascend to my Father and your Father, and my God and your God” (John 20:17).

How Could Jesus Still Be All Knowing After His Resurrection?

Continued from Part 2

Similarly, when asked if he would “at this time” restore the kingdom of Israel (Acts 1:6) Jesus replied:  “It is not for you to know times or seasons which the Father has placed in His own jurisdiction” (Acts 1:7).  Are we to conclude that the “equal” partners of the triune godhead have powers and knowledge, which they do not share with each other?  Even after his supposed resurrection, Jesus is still not all-knowing but is said to receive increments of knowledge from God.  

Where The New Testament Refutes The Christian Trinity

PART 2:  THE PROBLEM OF THE SON

The Master and the servant
There are many New Testament passages that refute the Christian doctrine of the Trinity.  An examination of statements attributed to Jesus by the Gospels, shows that he never said he was God or a part of God.  Jesus spoke of his Father in heaven as his God (John 20:17), to whom he attributed superior authority, knowledge, and greatness (Matthew 20:23, Mark 13:32, John 14:28).  The Trinity doctrine says “the Father” and “the Son” are coequal in power and substance, but what does the New Testament have to say?