From Messianic Jew to Counter-Missionary – Part 1

Julius Ciss’ riveting story of his five-year involvement in the “Hebrew Christian” movement is a unique “insider’s” perspective on a process that has ensnared thousands of Jews. Julius recounts his discovery of why Judaism rejects the missionary message, and describes the return to his own faith, ultimately leading him to establish the Canadian branch of Jews for Judaism.

From Messianic Jew to Counter-Missionary – Part 3

Julius Ciss’ riveting story of his five-year involvement in the “Hebrew Christian” movement is a unique “insider’s” perspective on a process that has ensnared thousands of Jews. Julius recounts his discovery of why Judaism rejects the missionary message, and describes the return to his own faith, ultimately leading him to establish the Canadian branch of Jews for Judaism.

From Messianic Jew to Counter-Missionary – Part 2

Julius Ciss’ riveting story of his five-year involvement in the “Hebrew Christian” movement is a unique “insider’s” perspective on a process that has ensnared thousands of Jews. Julius recounts his discovery of why Judaism rejects the missionary message, and describes the return to his own faith, ultimately leading him to establish the Canadian branch of Jews for Judaism.

Is the Term Messianic Jew Scriptural?

An Essay by Gerald Sigal
It was in Antioch, Syria, that “the disciples [of Jesus] were first called Christians” (Acts 11:26). The term “Christian” (Greek, Christianos, “followers of Christos”) is formed from Christos, “Christ,” and indicates “Christ’s adherent’s,” “those who belong to Christ,” or are “devoted to Christ.” It results from a common practice of the first century that identified adherents of an individual by attaching the termination -ianos (pl. -ianoi) to the name of the leader or master. The term “Christian” occurs only three times in the New Testament writings, and each time it is used by outsiders (Acts 11:26, 26:28; 1 Peter 4:16).