Inaccurate Predictions In The Fourth Gospel To Be Aware Of

Continued from Part 22

In a study made by Philip B. Harner, an examination was conducted of clauses in which an anarthrous predicate noun precedes the copulative verb.  Harner states that:

. . . E. C. Colwell examined this type of word-order and reached the tentative conclusion that “definite predicate nouns which precede the verb usually lack the article.”

How The Start of John’s Gospel Incorrectly Supports The Trinity

Continued from Part 21

C. Colwell offers a grammatical rule explaining the use of the article with a predicate nominative in the Greek New Testament.22 This rule seems to justify the trinitarian translation of John 1:1.  Colwell says:
A definite predicate nominative has the article when it follows the verb; it does not have the article when it precedes the verb.  Of course, this can be claimed as a rule only after it has been shown to describe the usage of the Greek New Testament as a whole or in large part. . . .

The First Verse In John Everyone Needs To Understand

Continued from Part 20

John 1:1
 It is in John 1:1 that the nature of the Logos (the Word) is explicitly stated.  The first verse of John, as translated in the King James Version, reads:  “In the beginning was the Word [ho logos], and the Word was with God [ton theon, accusative case of ho theos], and the Word was God [theos]” (John 1:1).