NEW TESTAMENT REFUTATIONS OF THE TRINITY DOCTRINE – Part 32

Continued from Part 31

Pneuma, “spirit” and parakletos, “helper”
The Greek word for spirit (pneuma) has many different meanings, the correct one being determined only from the context of each occurrence.  In Greek pneuma, is neuter, as are all pronouns referring to the spirit, making them necessarily impersonal.  Those New Testament translations which render the “spirit” as “He” instead of “it” do so because of trinitarian beliefs (e.g., John 14:17). 

NEW TESTAMENT REFUTATIONS OF THE TRINITY DOCTRINE – Part 23

Continued from Part 22

In a study made by Philip B. Harner, an examination was conducted of clauses in which an anarthrous predicate noun precedes the copulative verb.  Harner states that:

. . . E. C. Colwell examined this type of word-order and reached the tentative conclusion that “definite predicate nouns which precede the verb usually lack the article.”

NEW TESTAMENT REFUTATIONS OF THE TRINITY DOCTRINE – Part 22

Continued from Part 21

C. Colwell offers a grammatical rule explaining the use of the article with a predicate nominative in the Greek New Testament.22 This rule seems to justify the trinitarian translation of John 1:1.  Colwell says:
A definite predicate nominative has the article when it follows the verb; it does not have the article when it precedes the verb.  Of course, this can be claimed as a rule only after it has been shown to describe the usage of the Greek New Testament as a whole or in large part. . . .

NEW TESTAMENT REFUTATIONS OF THE TRINITY DOCTRINE – Part 6

Jesus, the man, is said to be the mediator between God and men.  Paul writes, “For there is one God, and one mediator also between God and men, the man Christ Jesus” (1 Timothy 2:5).   Jesus is called a “man,” even after his alleged resurrection.  Now, if this supposedly resurrected Jesus were himself God and acted in total accord with the other two-thirds of God, he could not be a mediator, an intermediary or conciliator,  “between God and men.”