Does Psalms 110:1 show that the Messiah will be greater than David and be a divine being?

Doesn’t Psalms 110:1 show that the Messiah will not only be greater than David but must also be a divine being? Read this interesting article by Gerald Sigal to find out…

Answer:

Psalms 110:1 states: “A Psalm concerning David. HaShem says to my master: ‘Sit at My right hand, until I make your enemies your footstool.'” There is no problem with accepting that one’s descendants can rise to a more exalted position than we possess at present. There is no problem with David accepting that the Messiah will be greater than he is. But, there is nothing in this verse to show that David is referring to the Messiah when he writes ‘adoni, “my master,” “my lord.” Moreover, there is nothing in David’s words to indicate that the individual he refers to as “my master” is a divine being. David “concerning” himself wrote Psalm 110 poetically in the third person. Christians explain this verse based on New Testament exegesis. The Marcan Jesus says:

How is it that the scribes say that the Christ is the son of David?
David himself said by the Holy Spirit; “The Lord [kyrios] said to my Lord [kyrio mou], ‘Sit at My right hand, until I put your enemies beneath your feet.‘ David himself calls him ‘Lord,’ how is he then his son? (Mark 12:35-37).

Mark’s rendering uses the Greek word kyrios, “lord,” twice in the sentence, and the Christian translations into English capitalize the initial letter of the word to read “Lord” in both instances. Jesus’ discourse is only possible if he and those he spoke to were conversing in Greek. The exegetical problems that Mark’s Jesus refers to are only apparent in the Greek rendering and renderings from the Greek into other languages. In the Greek text, the initial kyrios is a reference to “the Lord,” that is, God, and translates the Tetragrammaton (Y- H-V-H, the four letter name of God often referred to in Hebrew as HASHEM–THE NAME). The second kyrios, renders ‘adoni, “my master,” “my lord” (which according to Mark’s understanding refers to “the Christ“). That is, the Greek, kyrios, is used to render two separate and distinct Hebrew words in the Greek translation. The confusion it creates in Greek does not exist in the Hebrew original. As a result, the Marcan Jesus’ exegesis is non-existent in the Hebrew and incorrect in its understanding of the Greek rendering.

© Gerald Sigal