NEW TESTAMENT REFUTATIONS OF THE TRINITY DOCTRINE – Part 24

Continued from Part 23

 The trinitarian argument that the second theos in John 1:1 does not require the article to be considered definite can only be motivated by theological considerations, whereas to translate the word theos as “a god” is consistent not only with John’s use of the Philonic Logos, but with the New Testament’s general explanation of Jesus’ relationship to God.  

NEW TESTAMENT REFUTATIONS OF THE TRINITY DOCTRINE – Part 11

Continued from Part 10

Jesus as an instrument of the Creator
Even the authors of John, Colossians, and Hebrews, who elevate Jesus to a point where he is viewed as the medium through whom things are done, do not claim that he is the Creator or part of a triune deity.  They consider him the supernatural instrument through which the Creator works:

What does Jesus mean when he says when he says, “I am the Alpha and the Omega…?

Let's find out

In the Book of Revelation we find the verse, “I am the Alpha and the Omega, says the Lord God, who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty” (Revelation 1:8). But what do you do with Revelation 22:13, which appears to be Jesus speaking (see verse 16), when he says, “I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end”?