The Ultimate Question If Jesus Was Truly God

Continued from Part 34

Is the Trinity Doctrine a New Testament teaching?
Paul, speaking of Jesus says, “for in him all the fullness of deity dwells in bodily form” (Colossians 2:9).  Whether Paul is teaching a form of dualism or that this supposed supernatural power that has indwelled Jesus has become God’s unique representative to mankind is a dispute for Christian commentators to ponder.  

Explanation of How The Holy Spirit Is A Part of The Trinity

Continued from Part 33

Leaving out reference to the holy sprit
In the opening salutation of Paul’s letters to various churches (Romans through Thessalonians) he sends personal greetings from “God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.”  If “the Holy Spirit” were an integral and personal part of a triune deity, then why does He not send His personal greetings as well? 

The Relevance Of Jesus Being Tempted By Satan

Satan’s temptation
 If Jesus is God as well as man how could Satan expect to tempt him?  Mark simply states that Jesus was tempted by Satan (1:13) but Matthew (4:1-11) and Luke (4:1-13) elaborate the story.  It is claimed that during Jesus’ alleged forty days’ sojourn in the desert following his baptism by John, Satan tempted him with promises of an earthly kingdom if Jesus would only worship him.

A Single Word Absence In John That Skews The Entire Meaning

Continued from Part 23

 The trinitarian argument that the second theos in John 1:1 does not require the article to be considered definite can only be motivated by theological considerations, whereas to translate the word theos as “a god” is consistent not only with John’s use of the Philonic Logos, but with the New Testament’s general explanation of Jesus’ relationship to God.  

Does The New Testament Consider God And Jesus To Be The Same?

Continued from Part 8

Paul’s Jesus:  A savior but not God

The New Testament authors make a definite distinction between the one-and-only God and Jesus, never considering them one and the same.  For instance, we find this distinction expressed in the statement:  “Kindness and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord” (2 Peter 1:2).  This clarifies the meaning of the preceding verse, which reads, in part, “by the righteousness of our God and of [the] Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 1:1).  The author of these two verses indicates that he considers God and Jesus to be two distinct beings.