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Is This Phrase proof Enough That Jesus Is A God?

Continued from Part 29

Can the Eusebian phraseology, “Go ye, and make disciples of all the nations in my name,” be considered as decisive proof that the clause “baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit” was lacking in the manuscripts available to Eusebius?

Where Esebeius Comes To Play In The Christian Trinity

Continued from Part 28

Eusebius, who supported the orthodox trinitarian position, was present at the Council of Nicaea and was involved in the debates concerning whether Jesus was part of the essence of God or a creation of God.  

Claims In The Gospel of Matthew To Not Be Confused By

Continued from Part 27

The baptism formula
Some Christian commentators allege that the command by Matthew’s Jesus to, “Go therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 28:19) shows the existence of a triune deity.  

The True Answer Of The Father Of Jesus

Continued from Part 26

Establishing paternity
  In Matthew’s version of the alleged conception of Jesus story (Matthew 1:18) it states that Mary “was found to be with child by holy spirit [with no definite article before “holy spirit”].” 

What You Need To Know About The Holy Spirit Mentioned In The Gospels

Continued from Part 25

PART 3:  THE PROBLEM OF THE HOLY SPIRIT
 The impersonal nature of holy spirit

The spirit of God is not a being with its own identity and separate consciences.  It is divisible and able to be distributed as God sees fit.  For example, God took of the spirit that was upon Moses and put it upon the seventy elders of Israel (Numbers 11:17-25). 

The Relevance Of Jesus Being Tempted By Satan

Satan’s temptation
 If Jesus is God as well as man how could Satan expect to tempt him?  Mark simply states that Jesus was tempted by Satan (1:13) but Matthew (4:1-11) and Luke (4:1-13) elaborate the story.  It is claimed that during Jesus’ alleged forty days’ sojourn in the desert following his baptism by John, Satan tempted him with promises of an earthly kingdom if Jesus would only worship him.

A Single Word Absence In John That Skews The Entire Meaning

Continued from Part 23

 The trinitarian argument that the second theos in John 1:1 does not require the article to be considered definite can only be motivated by theological considerations, whereas to translate the word theos as “a god” is consistent not only with John’s use of the Philonic Logos, but with the New Testament’s general explanation of Jesus’ relationship to God.  

Inaccurate Predictions In The Fourth Gospel To Be Aware Of

Continued from Part 22

In a study made by Philip B. Harner, an examination was conducted of clauses in which an anarthrous predicate noun precedes the copulative verb.  Harner states that:

. . . E. C. Colwell examined this type of word-order and reached the tentative conclusion that “definite predicate nouns which precede the verb usually lack the article.”

How The Start of John’s Gospel Incorrectly Supports The Trinity

Continued from Part 21

C. Colwell offers a grammatical rule explaining the use of the article with a predicate nominative in the Greek New Testament.22 This rule seems to justify the trinitarian translation of John 1:1.  Colwell says:
A definite predicate nominative has the article when it follows the verb; it does not have the article when it precedes the verb.  Of course, this can be claimed as a rule only after it has been shown to describe the usage of the Greek New Testament as a whole or in large part. . . .

The First Verse In John Everyone Needs To Understand

Continued from Part 20

John 1:1
 It is in John 1:1 that the nature of the Logos (the Word) is explicitly stated.  The first verse of John, as translated in the King James Version, reads:  “In the beginning was the Word [ho logos], and the Word was with God [ton theon, accusative case of ho theos], and the Word was God [theos]” (John 1:1).