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The Mission of Jews for Judaism is to strengthen and preserve Jewish identity through education and counseling that counteracts deceptive proselytizing targeting Jews for conversion and promotes critical thinking.

What You Need To Understand When Jesus Was Represented As Subordinate

Continued from Part 14

Subordination and subjection
Wherever the relationship of Jesus to God is treated in the New Testament, Jesus is always represented in a subordinate position.  This subordinate role can be seen in the fact that Jesus views himself as a messenger:  “He who receives you receives me, and he who receives me receives Him who sent me” (Matthew 10:40; see also John 5:36).  Jesus acknowledges his subordination and subjection to God when he declares that God is greater than he is (John 14:28), that he does nothing on his own initiative, speaking and doing only what God has taught him (John 8:28-29), and seeking not his own will, but the will of the God who sent him (John 5:30, 6:38).

Exploring The Syncretic Roots of Paul Properly

Continued from Part 13

Syncretic roots of Paul’s Jesus
Much of Christianity is the development of Paul and his theological descendants, who presented the pagans with a diluted form of Judaism in Hellenized garb.  It is true that the Hellenistic Jewish philosophy of Philo paved the way to such a syncretism, but Philo certainly would have been shocked at the resulting distortion which followed in Paul’s wake.  Philo expected the Messiah, but he never identified the Messiah with the Logos, as was done by later Christian theology.  

Was Jesus Truly The Creator? Full Explanations You Need To Consider

Continued from Part 11

Nevertheless, Barnes believes that Jesus is himself the uncreated and eternal Creator.  However, he does not base his belief on Revelation 3:14.  Of this verse he says:

If it were demonstrated from other sources that Christ was, in fact, a created being, and the first that God had made, it cannot be denied that this language would appropriately express that fact.  But it cannot be made out from the mere use of the language here; and as the language is susceptible of other interpretations, it cannot be employed to prove that Christ is a created being.3

New Testaments Confusions Around Claims That Jesus Is The Creator

Continued from Part 10

Jesus as an instrument of the Creator
Even the authors of John, Colossians, and Hebrews, who elevate Jesus to a point where he is viewed as the medium through whom things are done, do not claim that he is the Creator or part of a triune deity.  They consider him the supernatural instrument through which the Creator works:

False Claims In The Gospels About True Deity

Continued from Part 9

“I am”
John’s Jesus states: “‘Abraham your father rejoiced to see my day; and he saw it, and was glad.’  The Jews therefore said to him:  ‘You are not yet fifty years old, and have you seen Abraham?’  Jesus said to them:  ‘Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham came into being, I am’” (John 8:56-58).   Is the author of this Gospel claiming that Jesus is part of a triune deity when he has Jesus say, “before Abraham came into being, I am” (verse 8:58)?

Does The New Testament Consider God And Jesus To Be The Same?

Continued from Part 8

Paul’s Jesus:  A savior but not God

The New Testament authors make a definite distinction between the one-and-only God and Jesus, never considering them one and the same.  For instance, we find this distinction expressed in the statement:  “Kindness and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord” (2 Peter 1:2).  This clarifies the meaning of the preceding verse, which reads, in part, “by the righteousness of our God and of [the] Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 1:1).  The author of these two verses indicates that he considers God and Jesus to be two distinct beings.  

The Division of The Divine Essence Misunderstood In The Gospel of John

Continued from Part 7

God:  undivided and without equal
How did John’s Jesus view the possibility of a division in the divine essence?  Chapter 17 of the Gospel of John records a prayer, which its author attributes to Jesus.  In verse 2 of this prayer, Jesus views himself as being sent by God, his Father, who “gave him authority over all mankind.”  But of his “Father” he is quoted, in verse 3, as saying that he is “the only true God.”  Jesus does not say, “We are the only true God,” or even, “You Father and the Holy Spirit are the only true God,” but refers his remarks solely to the God whom he depicts as “Father.”